Camille Walala’s vision of a carless and colorful Oxford Street is a project that other cities would be wise to follow

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Barren and bare of pedestrians or any visible signs that London is a metropolis pulsating to the beat of millions of people, the sheer silence of the streets during the first lockdown shocked artist Camille Walala. Cycling around the city with her partner Julia Jomaa, almost void of vehicles, they began to reimagine the capital in a futuristic setting that replaced pollution with plants, and tailgating traffic with fountains. …


Gulab Singh Johrimal and its shadows of the past

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Nestled in one of the busiest markets in old Delhi, in the Chandni Chowk area, a lively hub where bedazzled saris and elaborate lehenga cholis adorn the window displays of hundreds of boutiques, you’ll find the Dariba Kalan bazaar.

In the late 17th-century, as the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan was designing the Taj Mahal, he commissioned his daughter Jahanara to develop a marketplace where the best products and foodstuffs from their reign could be showcased. …


Conquering mountains has come full circle — it is not only the foundation of all other types of climbing but the ultimate goal for many athletes

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Humans have certainly been climbing mountains since first starting to walk upright several million years ago. While the earliest ascents came out of necessity, for hunting food or moving nomadically through whatever terrain presented itself, the reason for modern mountaineering is best summed up in three words: “Because it’s there.” …


What compels an individual to voyage through one of the coldest climates on Earth?

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Connected by a beautiful ring of light, traversing the fields of ice that form the majestic wilderness of Greenland is an experience like no other. Hard to reach, with an almost prehistoric terrain, and a climate that feels imagined for a novel-there is something both daring and challenging about the world’s largest island. But it poses a uniqueness, something strangely difficult to find in a world of global travel and instant messaging.

During the dim wintry months, these vast plains are stacked with three to five meters of snow. Not many people travel to these immense ice masses in January, even fewer to cycle across. But that is what Tobias Woggon and Philip Ruopp settled upon for their next adventure. In Nordic Cycle, Woggon explains that not many people who took their tour had experienced biking at minus 30 degrees. “I consulted our friend Max,” he explains, “who had been riding his bike in Lapland, Finland the year before and was already experienced with the necessary technology and knew how to handle the cold.” …


To coincide with Ricardo Bofill’s birthday, Apartamento magazine’s creative director Nacho Alegre reflects on the legacy of a fellow Catalan

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For most of my life, I regarded Ricardo Bofill through an aura of mystery, almost irreality. His public persona, as I saw it in my teenage years, danced between that of a hermit-artist and celebrity. The public and critical opinion of him likewise split between respect and loathing, awe and dismissal. …


An assemblage of Americana

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Ripped, transformed, and then injected with a healthy dose of nostalgia, Anthony Zinonos’ collages are playful commentaries on the way we choose to go about our lives. Through fantastical settings and graphic souvenirs of Americana consumer culture, his witty depictions pack a powerful message about societal evolution.

Zinonos is a man of the world. Born in Johannesburg, South Africa, he spent his teenage years in Cyprus before moving to the edges of eastern England. He studied at the Norwich School of Art and Design and spent a year in Athens studying photography. As a child, all he did was draw and draw, but this medium frustrated him as a teenager. He wanted to make his works more realistic but didn’t have the “skills or patience to learn,” he tells us. “My dad showed me how to use a camera, then process and develop the film, which I took to like a duck to water.” He went on to major in Fine Art specializing in Print and Photomedia. All the while continuing to experiment with collage, something he later returned to after working in photography, screen printing, film, and animation. …


The man who built capitals cities and made political statements through design

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The architectural voice of Brazil, Oscar Niemeyer worked until the age of 104. Known as a lover of life, political and economic equality, and constructing iconic forms-the Pritzker Prize winner turned his gestural sketches on cocktail napkins into realized structures around the world. His political ties meant he fled Brazil for his safety, later finding peaceful sanctuary in France, a place where he could embrace his vision. Niemeyer’s storied career spanned over 78 years, 600 projects, and a delightful autobiography aptly titled The Curve of Time.

Few people have lived longer or accomplished more than Niemeyer. Known for his fresh take on Modernism, which married humanism with sensual forms. His contributions to the urban landscape and social discourse made him one of the most important figures in architecture and a pioneer of contemporary Brazilian design. Born on December 15, 1907, in Rio de Janeiro and completed his early studies at the Colégio Santo Antônio Maria Zaccaria in 1928. He then attended the Escola Nacional de Belas Artes, earning his architectural engineering degree in 1934. In 1935, he took his first job in the office of Lucío Costa. …


A tantalizing proof of concept that was cut short

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Mercedes-Benz considered the head of its racing department, Rudolf Uhlenhaut, “the driving engineer.” His driving talent helped develop these dominating cars. In an anecdote from the 1955 Nürburgring Grand Prix, famed driver Juan Manuel Fangio had offhandedly mentioned that his car had not been properly set up. Uhlenhaut, fresh from an executive’s lunch and in suit and tie, jumped into the race car and turned in a lap-three seconds faster than the Argentine world champion. “He should practice a little more,” Uhlenhaut was rumored to have recommended to Fangio.

Born in London to English and German parents, Uhlenhaut joined Daimler-Benz in 1931, straight from Munich University. In 1936, he was appointed the head of the racing department. This period was marked by Auto Union’s Bernd Rosemeyer rivalry with Mercedes’ Rudolf Caracciola. Uhlenhaut faced Auto Union’s racing engineer Ferdinand Porsche on countless tracks. Caracciola had won the European Driver’s Championship in 1935, while Rosemeyer, a motorcycle racer, had never driven a racing car before Auto Union’s Silver Arrow. In 1936, Rosemeyer swept the championships in Germany, Switzerland, and Italy. He took home the Vanderbilt Cup in America, plus humiliated Mercedes-Benz and its crumbling W25 race car. …


Relive the iconic postmodernist legacy of Memphis Milano on its 40th anniversary

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Functionalism just wasn’t enough for a young troop of Milano designers and architects who were gathered in the apartment of Ettore Sottsass on December 11, 1980. These revolutionary mavens wanted to command attention and communicate a message, they wanted to challenge the status quo and show that design could be emotional, humorous, and sensual. Listening on loop to Bob Dylan’s 1966 single Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again, this collective coined ‘Memphis,’ a movement with a two-fold reference to ancient Egyptian pharaohs and the Tennessee birthplace of Aretha Franklin and Elvis Presley. …


“There was never a plan”

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“Although my work is dark and serious, there is a childish, playful naivety and innocence about it,” explains Alma Haser, whose body of work thrives inside the subjunctive imagination. Cubist forms infused with a paradise of origami structures create a kaleidoscopic effect that challenges traditional perceptions of portraiture. A photographer by trade, Haser often uses techniques more familiar in craft, such as folding, weaving, and painting to give her work a more dimensional edge that parallels collage and other artistic expressions.

“I don’t want people to understand my work straight away, because that would be…

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